Jan. 16, 2020

FFR 001 - The $300M Dollar Button

FFR 001 - The $300M Dollar Button

When designing funnels many funnel builders overlook how they approach the layout of their order forms, and don’t take it as it seriously as they should. But a poorly designed form can make a huge difference in sales   The biggest obstacle...


  • When designing funnels many funnel builders overlook how they approach the layout of their order forms, and don’t take it as it seriously as they should. But a poorly designed form can make a huge difference in sales

 

  • The biggest obstacle behind creating a successful form is actually taking the time to investigate where there are opportunities for improvements... and it’s easy to just assume you know what is best. 

 

 

  • This is a story of an incredibly simple adjustment to a checkout form that resulted in a $300,000,000 increase in sales 

 

  • The form had just two fields, two buttons, and one link.

 

  • The fields were Email Address and Password. The buttons were Login and Register. The link was Forgot Password. It was the login form for the site. 

 

  • It’s a form users see all the time, so the question was... How could they have any problems with it?

 

  • The problem wasn’t as much about the form’s layout as it was where the form lived. Users would encounter it after they filled their shopping cart with products they wanted to purchase and pressed the Checkout button. It came before they could actually enter the information to pay for the product.




  • And the crucial thing was the button came BEFORE they could actually enter the information to pay for the product.

 

  • The thinking behind it was to enable repeat customers to be able to purchase faster, and they didn’t think the first time users would mind registering. 

 

  • A usability test showed usability test showed their thinking was dead wrong... they did mind registering

 

  • The most direct feedback they got was... “I’m not here to enter into a relationship. I just want to buy something.”

 

  • Some common issues they came across were... first-time shoppers couldn’t remember if it was their first time... and others got frustrated with email and password combinations failing. 

 

  • Some interesting stats showed they were getting 160,000 password resets per day and 75% of those never completed the purchase anyway. 

 

  • In the end they realised the form was making life for customers harder, not easier, and only help a small percentage of customers.

 

  • Then came the $30m fix

 

  • The designers took away the Register button. In its place, they put a “Continue” button with a simple message: “You do not need to create an account to make purchases on our site. Simply click Continue to proceed to checkout. To make your future purchases even faster, you can create an account during checkout.”

 

  • The results: The number of customers purchasing went up by 45% which resulted in an extra $15 million the first month. For the first year, the site saw an additional $300,000,000.

 

  • What can you do to improve your order forms?
    • Set up triggers to fire in GTM for error messages in the URL
    • Always test the form in test mode before going live 
    • Look for any form fields that are unnecessary and have the potential to cause friction
    • Put a chat box on the page for people to contact you
    • Use HotJar recording to watch user activity
    • Split test order forms to test different layouts